Dover beach poem summary. Dover Beach Summary by Matthew Arnold 2019-03-02

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Poem Analysis: Matthew Arnold's Dover Beach

dover beach poem summary

This final image has also been variously interpreted by the critics. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; - on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land, Listen! Dwight Culler, Imaginative Reason: The Poetry of Matthew Arnold New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966. The process is continuous and the poet focuses on their rhythmic movement. Arnold through 'Dover Beach' describes the effects of industrialization of the 19th century England. He completed an undergraduate degree at Balliol College, Oxford University after which he taught Classics at Rugby School.

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Summary of “Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

At the beginning of the fourth stanza it becomes clear that the companion who is looking out over the water with the speaker is most likely a lover or romantic partner. However, it is poignant because it reveals a darker potential in the beautiful. Here he points out that in ancient times Sophocles heard the same sound of the pebbles on the shore, and it reminded him of the ebb and flow of human misery. Now Arnold hears the sound of this Dover Beach, and he finds in it the same thought. No mere words can express the sheer brilliance with which the writes. The natural scene is amalgamated with a sense of spiritual security established by the words calm, full, fair and tranquil. No longer is the populous united by a common Christian faith in God by, as Arnold sees it, spread apart by new sciences and conflicting opinions.

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A Short Analysis of Matthew Arnold’s ‘Dover Beach’

dover beach poem summary

The land is Moon blanchedi. Works Cited Baum, Paull F. Here, the moment is the visceral serenity the speaker feels in studying the landscape, and the contradictory fear that that serenity then leads him to feel. Arnold calls upon his newlywed wife to show solidarity and fidelity: if we cannot have faith in religion, we can have faith in each other, in human companionship and love. He also seems to have borrowed the main setting of his novella 2005 from Dover Beach, additionally playing with the fact that Arnold's poem was composed on his honeymoon see above. Then in lines 6 and 9 there is an invitation - to come and fill your senses - for the reader or for the speaker's companion? Sophocles long ago Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea. In fact, Duffin 1962 illustrated that Dover Beach provides a lovely picture of married love: the poet, looking out on the calm, moonlit straits, speaks over his shoulder to his wife.

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Dover Beach Poem by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

In the next stanza, the speaker laments the lack of faith in the modern society. Since its founding, the Academy has awarded more money to poets than any other organization. The disordered rise and fall of human misery is symbolic to the ebb and flow of the sea waves. The speaker is able to see across the Channel to the French side of the water. Arnold chose to use first, second and third person point of view in order to fully engage with the reader. Dover is a city in England that is famous for White Cliffs.

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Matthew Arnold: Poems Quotes and Analysis

dover beach poem summary

Stanza 2- It is an allusion to the famous tragic poet Sophocles. Now the speaker compares this world to a dark place where we are completely unaware of what we are doing. The second stanza is much shorter and relates the world in which the two characters are in to the larger picture of history. The poem consists of 37 lines and is divided into four unequal stanzas. At the start of the poem, readers could visualize a man standing at the edge of Dover Beach, feeling down and out.


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Dover Beach Poem by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

The so what answer, or theme of the poem, centers around our perception of reality. Thus, Arnold sees in nature both wonder - for it can help man transcend the world's limitations - and cause for sadness - since mankind seems to be moving further away from such potential escape. A mood of sensory awareness is created as the landscape composed of the tranquil sea, moonlight and the strait gives a picture that is constituted of balance, stability, and harmony. He also notes that the image occurs in 's. They are more isolated and lonely.


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Analysis of Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

There is a gentle breeze, that blows gently and the sea looks calm for the night. Important questions are raised after reading this poem. Overall, these lines illustrate the point that life can be beautiful, but also difficult. He is sometimes also called as the third great Victorian poet. To find out, you have to continue to the next line. Underneath are shifting sands and tumbling stones. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; —on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.

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Summary and Analysis of the Poem by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

The first stanza starts with a straightforward description of the sea and the effects of light, but note the change in pace as the syllabic content forces then relaxes with long and short vowels, mimicking the sea as wavelets shift the pebbles. Its message - like that of many of his other poems - is that the world's mystery has declined in the face of modernity. The more frequent the rhyme of regular lines the more confident the reader becomes and arguably, the less complex the poem. A certain melancholy flows into the second stanza. Now though, this time as passed. The spiritual and religious faith that was once unbreakable was shivering now.

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Analysis of Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

The setting is inside a room, may be a hotel, on the coast of the English Channel near the English town Dover. Arnold sees life ahead as a continual battle against the darkness and, with the decay of Christianity and the demise of faith, only the beacon of interpersonal love can light the way. Here we have a comparison between human misery, ebbing and flowing, and the sea, ebbing and flowing. Throughout his thirty-five years in this position Arnold developed an interest in education, an interest which fed into both his critical works and his poetry. The poem ends on a gorgeous, heartbreaking note, with the couple clinging to their love in a world of violence and fear and pain. The world has no meaning but the meaning we assign to it, and this is both stirringly beautiful and strikingly terrifying to think about.


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Dover Beach Summary and Analysis

dover beach poem summary

The speaker laments this decline of faith through melancholy diction. It is receding farther out into the strait. . The poet too finds himself deeply affected by the tragic aspect of the sea and of human. Stanza three introduces the idea of religion into the equation. There is no joy, love, light, certainty, peace, sympathy in it. Dover Beach - Words straits - narrow passages of water moon-blanched - made white or pale by the moon tremulous - shaking, quivering cadence - rhythm Aegean - sea that lies between Greece and Turkey turbid - confused,cloudy,obscure shingle - tiny pebbles, stones on a beach hath - have archaic certitude - complete certainty,conviction darkling - growing dark Dover Beach is a complex poem about the challenges to theosophical, existential and moral issues.

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