Romeo and juliet starting monologue. Romeo and Juliet: Juliet's Monologue 2019-02-08

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No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 3 Page 2

romeo and juliet starting monologue

A thousand times the worse, to want thy light. William Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet Act 2, sc. Look thou but sweet And I am proof against their enmity. These soliloquies add complexity and depth to various characters thereby magnifying their life-like appeal. It is the East, and Juliet is the sun! Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night. Was that my father that went hence so fast? Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night; For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Whiter than new snow on a raven's back.

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Romeo and Juliet Balcony Scene Act 2 with Explanatory Notes

romeo and juliet starting monologue

What should she do here? I must hence to wait; I beseech you, follow straight. But sadly tell me who. Arise, fair sun, and kill , Who is already sick and pale with grief That thou her maid art far more fair than she. He is a powerful, noble man, and Prince of Verona. Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match, Play'd for a pair of stainless maidenhoods: Hood my unmann'd blood, bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold, Think true love acted simple modesty. Mercutio - O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow, That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops -- Juliet.

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Romeo and Juliet: Romeo's Monologue

romeo and juliet starting monologue

Juliet is about to commit suicide via poison. There are, however, technical differences. O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek! Servant Ye say honestly: rest you merry! Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet? Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late: I'll to my rest. It is obvious through one of the most fore-boding Romeo and Juliet monologues that the rest of the play will be centered around the unnecessary fighting of these two families. Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague? All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then? Juliet - Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, Towards Phoebus' lodging: such a wagoner As Phaethon would whip you to the west, And bring in cloudy night immediately. Usually, no other characters are present when one character is giving a soliloquy. Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast, Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.

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Dramatic Monologue for Men by Shakespeare

romeo and juliet starting monologue

O true apothecary, Thy drugs are quick. So thrive my soul-- Juliet. She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair, To merit bliss by making me despair: She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow Do I live dead that live to tell it now. It is my lady; O, it is my love! What should she do here? He describes the fight in a serious, emotional, and pleading monologue. And, in this rage, with some great kinsman's bone, As with a club, dash out my desperate brains? No, coz, I rather weep. She speaks, yet she says nothing. For this time, all the rest depart away: You Capulet; shall go along with me: And, Montague, come you this afternoon, To know our further pleasure in this case, To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.

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No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 3 Page 2

romeo and juliet starting monologue

This night you shall behold him at our feast; Read o'er the volume of young Paris' face, And find delight writ there with beauty's pen; Examine every married lineament, And see how one another lends content And what obscured in this fair volume lies Find written in the margent of his eyes. Before us on the ground level is a large open space, which corresponds to the orchestra circle on the floor of a modern play-house. This is the place where Romeo and Juliet first professed their love for one another. And, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss A dateless bargain to engrossing death. Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide! Some word there was, worser than Tybalt's death, That murd'red me.

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No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 3 Page 2

romeo and juliet starting monologue

God knows when we shall meet again. With love's light wings did I o'erperch these walls, 70 , And what love can do, that dares love attempt: Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me. Nurse A man, young lady! Alack, alack, is it not like that I, So early waking, what with loathsome smells, And shrieks like mandrakes' torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:. O gentle Romeo, If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully: Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won, I'll frown, and be perverse, and say thee nay, 100 So thou wilt woo: but else, not for the world. Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest! She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate-stone On the fore-finger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep; Her wagon-spokes made of long spiders' legs, The cover of the wings of grasshoppers, The traces of the smallest spider's web, The collars of the moonshine's watery beams, Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film, Her wagoner a small grey-coated gnat, Not so big as a round little worm Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid; Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub, Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers.

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Romeo and Juliet: Mercutio's Monologue

romeo and juliet starting monologue

This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what: You must contrary me! It is my lady, O, it is my love! Be not her maid, since she is envious. Her nurse has been charged to meet Romeo and act as a messenger, so the two can elope and be free of their families. Or shall we on without a apology? So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows, As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows. The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love, And the continuance of their parents' rage, Which, but their children's end, nought could remove, Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage; The which if you with patient ears attend, What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. O that she knew she were! Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on The dashing rocks thy seasick, weary bark. This monologue is great for females looking to show their sensitive, romantic sides. What light through yonder window breaks? From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whole misadventured piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife.

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Monologues in Romeo and Juliet

romeo and juliet starting monologue

First Servant You are looked for and called for, asked for and sought for, in the great chamber. My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words Of thy tongue's uttering, yet I know the sound. Oh, I wish I was the glove on that hand so that I could touch that cheek. Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear. Anxious, Juliet entertains the idea that the nurse was perhaps unable to meet Romeo and confirm if he actually wants to marry Juliet. The clock struck nine when I did send the Nurse. Thus with a kiss I die.

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Soliloquy in Romeo and Juliet

romeo and juliet starting monologue

Let me stand here till thou remember it. Since the friar married the couple in secret, Juliet is nervous that the friar is now trying to cover up what he did by killing her in case he gets in trouble with either the Capulets or Montagues. Will I die of suffocation before Romeo comes? Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This particular monologue is fairly long, with 30 lines, but your skill-set is sure to show if you can master the raw emotion displayed by Juliet. This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him, only lacks a cover: The fish lives in the sea, and 'tis much pride For fair without the fair within to hide: That book in many's eyes doth share the glory, That in gold clasps locks in the golden story; So shall you share all that he doth possess, By having him, making yourself no less. Thus then in brief: The valiant Paris seeks you for his love. Nurse Faith, I can tell her age unto an hour.

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